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theartofanimation:

Phan Thu Trang

221btimelordette:

I was initially planning on being a casual fan, but then I thought, why not just let it consume my soul instead? 

semaphore-drivethru:

So let’s talk about your new favorite website and app, Duolingo.

image

I haven’t seen anyone on my dash talking about this and that’s a fucking crying shame because Duolingo is the shit. You can use Duolingo to learn Spanish, French, Italian, German, Portuguese. Even Dutch, if you’re feeling frisky and want to play with a Beta test (Dutch is not available on Android, but def. grabbable online for all of your language expanding pleasures).

What makes Duolingo so damn special? They make learning a new language into something they call gamefication. You earn points and you kick your friends’ asses with your mad linguistic skills.(Hell yes I’m at the top of my personal leaderboard)

image

No sass about my idioms being weak. Deutsche sprache, schwere sprache.

And it works. Like, really really works.

image

But what makes Duolingo so amazing is that its goal from the very beginning was to be a free and easily accessible ESL tool in order to make people more employable world wide. Even their English certification test (normally only $20!) is free right now!

And there are no ads.

None.

The program is supported through the crowd-sourced translations the users do as part of the “immersion” training. You get practice, the Duolingo community talks about it and makes corrections and meshes the good work from different people together, and the final product becomes a translation Duolingo sells to keep the lights on. So to speak.

Will you sound like a native? Probably not. Will you be able to hold your own in a gramatically imperfect and probably clunky way in a normal conversation? Hey, it’s a damn sight better than where I’m at now, so I’m in. And so should you.

It’s super easy to find a way to use it. You can get it from the Apple Store and you can get it from Google Play. You can log in to the website and learn and find extras that aren’t on the app. You can… probably not use it via smoke signals, but I won’t stand in your way if you want to try, bro.

Duolingo.com

Go forth and be awesome in many tongues, my friends.

thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photoSill Level: Beginner
Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.
The Basics
You camera has a sensor.

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 
Aperture
The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.
Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.
A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 
A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 
Shutter Speed
Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.
Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.
Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 
Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.
There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 
ISO
ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.
Getting the Balance
A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.
To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 
To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 
If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 
Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 
TL;DR
Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
Not enough light = underexposed
Too much light = overexposed
Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
A large hole is a small f-stop
A small hole is a large f-stop
A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
ISO is the amplification of the sensor
HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result
Photos by Froggie
You can find me here: [tumblr | wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.
If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photo
Sill Level: Beginner

Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.

The Basics

You camera has a sensor.

image

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

image

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 

Aperture

The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

image

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.

Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

image

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.

A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 

A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

image

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 

Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.

Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.

Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 

Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

image

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

image

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.

There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 

ISO

ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

image

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.

Getting the Balance

A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.

To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 

To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 

If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 

Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 

TL;DR

  • Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
  • Not enough light = underexposed
  • Too much light = overexposed
  • Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
  • A large hole is a small f-stop
  • A small hole is a large f-stop
  • A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
  • A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
  • A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
  • A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
  • ISO is the amplification of the sensor
  • HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
  • LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result

Photos by Froggie

You can find me here: [tumblr wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.

If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

relahvant:

the-navel-treatment:

riversnogs:

aaaand now I’m crying.

This one. This is the one that did me in.

don’t do this to me

(Source: bloodydifficult)

Aug 7

myloish:

2011 tumblr aesthetic. comments under every post and an accompanying gif of rachel from glee. oversaturated graphics with eight frames to keep under the 500kb limit. having lost the ability to can

Aug 6
sansaspark:

magconbabe-matt:

This shit better work

HAH I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND LOOK WHAT I GOT FROM MY DAD TODAY OUT OF THE BLUE

sansaspark:

magconbabe-matt:

This shit better work

HAH I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND LOOK WHAT I GOT FROM MY DAD TODAY OUT OF THE BLUE

Aug 4

annie-leonhardts-ass:

Did you ever just feel so lucky for knowing someone you met online?
Like.. I was one click away from not following you. I was one second away from never even knowing of your existence. 
I would never have been this happy. 

bloodphoenix:

image

(Source: wamwanfood)

Aug 2
vincerediem:

ursulavernon:

wickedgirlssavingourselves:

Brontësaurus

This is the best thing ever.

I fucking love this website.

vincerediem:

ursulavernon:

wickedgirlssavingourselves:

Brontësaurus

This is the best thing ever.

I fucking love this website.

(Source: bloodydifficult)

giliananderson:

date a girl who’s me 

amethystdisaster:

REBELLION!!!

(Source: iraffiruse)